Indian superstitions in malaysian homes 2
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Malaysia is a boiling pot of culture, much due to the multiracial country that we are. That being said, our neighbourhood dances to the same rhythm. We have neighbours of different faith and beliefs, and we have learnt to respect it. However, there are only so much we know about our friends next door, and we’re here to help you out!

With Deepavali, an auspicious day celebrated by the majority of the Indian community here in Malaysia coming around the corner, here are a few superstitions you might not have known about, in an Indian household.

Let's start off by watching a with a fun Deepavali video from PropSocial below:



1. Boil Your Milk!

When a family moves into a new house, it is tradition to boil a pot of milk over the new kitchen stove, until the milk overflows from the pot. This is to signify an abundance of prosperity and food that will also bless new home. The boiled over milk is then offered to chosen deities, before it is offered to the guest with a bit of sugar.

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2. Crack Your (Coco)Nuts!

Yes! New house means new reasons to break things!

Don’t worry, there’s no collateral damage to the house, nothing important is being broken, but only a coconut. It’s a tradition when buying a new car or new house, for a family to throw a coconut to the ground, and made sure that it is shattered into pieces. This is to signify a commemoration of a new item, blessing it in the process.

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3. Mind Your Numbers!

…Particularly the numbers 3, 8 and 13. The number 8, in Indian numerology, is governed by Saturn (Shani), which is said to bring destruction. Numbers associated to 8, such as 17 and 26 (because 1+7=8 and 2+6=8), are also considered unlucky numbers. It’s uncanny that the number 26 is linked to a series of unfortunate events, such as the tsunami that struck on the 26th of December, 2004, and the Ahmedabad blasts on the 26th of September 2008, just to name a few.

The number 3, and 13 are associated with the Hindu saying “teen tigaada kaam bigaada”, which means “bad luck comes when there are three”. It’s even worse in some sections of the Indian community, when Friday the 13th comes by, with Friday being a bad day for some beliefs.



4. Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays = No Haircut Day!

You heard that right! Here’s why: elders believe that on these days, planets emit rays that can be harmful to the health and wellness of a person. The human brain is important to one, and should one get a haircut on the days, the rays will have a direct effect on the head. Here’s what the religious texts and astrology have to say about the days:


Tuesdays

Religious Text - Your life will be cut short by 8 months if you cut your hair on this day.

Astrology - Mars resides in blood, and hair originates from blood. Cutting your hair on a Tuesday can cause blood-related illnesses.


Thursdays

Religious Text - Thursday is the day of Lakshmi, Goddess of Wealth. You’ll have less in your pocket if you cut your hair.

Astrology - Thursday is reigned by Jupiter, which represents wealth, knowledge and offspring. You might have your intelligence diminished if you had a haircut today.


Saturdays

Astrology - Saturday is the day of Saturn, which signifies death as well as increases life. Get your haircut on this day, risk losing 7 months from your life.

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5. The “Evil Eye”

Have you ever noticed lemon and chillies being tied together at the doorway of some of your neighbours houses? That is the Nimbu-Mirchi Totka, and it’s used to ward off the “Evil Eye”, which can bring in a negative to the household.

It is believed that the Nimbu-Mirchi-Totka is there to keep Alakshmi, sister of Goddess Lakshmi away. Alakshmi is believed to bring poverty and misery, and likes sour, pungent and spicy things. The lemon and chillies are tied outside so she stays there to satisfy her hunger, and then walks away without casting her evil eye into the house.



Conclusion

So, there you have it - 4 Indian household superstitions you might or might not know. Do you have any superstitions you practice at home? Share with us in the comments below!

To end this piece, the PropSocial team would like to wish you all celebrating a very Happy Deepavali. May the Festival of Light bring you joy and prosperity into your homes and family! 




(Written by: Henry Choo, 16th Oct 2017)

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Seen maybe 1-2. Didn't know about all this superstitions. Thanks for sharing the information. Now I know more about it.

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These will be a good conversation starter with our indian friends.

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This is really interesting and good to know. It's so different from the Chinese superstitions.